How Major Party Policies Stack Up Against Climate Change.

With just one day to go before voting day on Saturday, climate change has emerged as a key issue that communities all across Australia care about - and are voting on. Make sure you know where the parties stand.

The ABC have asked scientists to review the policies of the major parties - the Coalition, the Labor Party and the Greens - and the results are very concerning. 

The review is scathing of the Coalition’s policies, with the scientists saying the policies won’t keep warming to below 1.5 degrees, or in line with our international obligations, nor will they even reach their own goal of net zero emissions by 2050. 

Scientist Lesley Hughes says “[the Coalition’s policy] may as well have been written in crayon”.

Labor fares slightly better, with the scientists calling the policies “a good start” but “not particularly ambitious”.

The policies won’t play Australia's fair share in keep warming below 1.5 degrees, and the reviewers had mixed opinions about whether they can get us to net zero emissions by 2050. 

The Greens came out on top for 3 of the 4 scientists, with their policies ranked as “consistent with the science”. The party’s ability to reach their ambitious goal of net zero emissions by 2035 was rated with a mix of low to moderate confidence based on a lack of planning detail. The ambition was supported, as was their understanding of the need for the speed and scale of pollution cuts to limit warming to 1.5 degrees.

Our friends at the Australian Conservation Foundation have written a policy tracker here, comparing policies from the three major parties on pollution cuts, nature protection, cleaning up transport and replacing coal and gas with clean energy. 

So what do people in our communities want?

The ABC’s Vote Compass data says climate change is the top issue for people’s vote.

A recent survey of more than 500 readers of Australian Community Media's agricultural publications found regional voters put climate change in the top two issues that mattered most. Australia’s biggest climate poll shows the majority of people in the city and the bush are positive about the benefits of greater climate action.

The election needs to deliver a parliament committed to deep pollution cuts if it is to represent everyday Australians.

If you haven’t decided who to vote for, jump onto ABC’s Vote Compass to find out which party or candidate supports the issues that you do.

The next term of government will be crucial in setting Australia up to act on climate change in this critical decade. Your vote is powerful. 

If you want your political leaders to act on climate change, make sure you vote for a party with strong climate policies, and, with more Australians nominating climate as their most important election issue, you’re in good company!

Now where’s my democracy sausage…?!

Jane & Lena, co-CEOs

Climate for Change


Election resources

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-05-10/climate-change-election-policies-scientists-give-verdicts/101020002

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-04-20/federal-election-liberal-labor-nationals-greens-policy-positions/100482298

Vote Compass https://votecompass.abc.net.au/

Electorate guide: https://www.abc.net.au/news/elections/federal/2022/guides

The ABC’s Vote Compass data says climate change is the top issue for people’s vote.

A recent survey of more than 500 readers of Australian Community Media's agricultural publications, found regional voters put climate change in the top two issues that mattered most. 

Australia’s biggest climate poll shows the majority of people in the city and the bush are positive about the benefits of greater climate action.



Aboriginal flag Torres Strait Islander flag

We acknowledge the traditional custodians of country throughout Australia, whose sovereignty was never ceded. We acknowledge that Indigenous peoples around the world are at the forefront of climate change, both in experiencing its effects and leading solutions for change. We pay our sincerest respects to all elders, past and present.